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What Is Andropause?

Health Sexual Wellness

What Is Andropause?

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What is Andropause?

We’ve all heard of “male menopause”. However, when this term is used, no (stereotypic) man “worth his salt” is going to take that term seriously! He would likely excuse it as an androgynous joke with no possible truth to it, particularly for him.

There are various medical terms for this age-related decrease in testosterone. You may have heard such conditions as late-onset male hypogonadism, androgen deficiency or testosterone deficiency, but each one refers to the same hormonal phenomenon.

Male menopause, while tangentially similar to female menopause in a few ways, is actually quite different. In males, the hormonal effects of aging occur comparatively slowly over the course of many years. According to the Mayo Clinic, testosterone levels decline approximately one percent each year after age 30.

The definition according to Merriam-Webster:

“A gradual and highly variable decline in the production of androgenic hormones and especially testosterone in the human male together with its associated effects that is held to occur during and after middle age —called also climacteric, male menopause.”

This process is also called reverse puberty and even “middlescence.” What man wants to be going through this just as his son is enjoying the height of his youth and corresponding testosterone levels?

When we hear the word andropause, how in the world are we men even going to imagine what it means? Men don’t talk about that unless they’re in the locker room or barbershop busting each other’s chops. The only permission men of my generation have had to talk about something of this nature had been through taunting and teasing other men. Therefore, we could never acknowledge a “weakness” of this sort without compromising our (perceived) manhood.

Research and Hormones

Research says that testosterone levels decrease around 10 percent per decade, and this can wreak havoc on men in the following ways: changes in sexual drive and function, emotional, psychological, and behavioral changes, sleep disturbances, decreased muscle mass and loss of muscle strength, gynecomastia (swollen or tender breasts), increased upper and central body fat, osteoporosis or weak bones, back pain, and increased cardiovascular risk.

Research and Hormones

Research says that testosterone levels decrease around 10 percent per decade, and this can wreak havoc on men in the following ways: changes in sexual drive and function, emotional, psychological, and behavioral changes, sleep disturbances, decreased muscle mass and loss of muscle strength, gynecomastia (swollen or tender breasts), increased upper and central body fat, osteoporosis or weak bones, back pain, and increased cardiovascular risk.

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